From the Founder of Good Data, NetBeans and Systinet

Roman Stanek

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LucidEra: the People Express of On-Demand BI?

I am not happy to see LucidEra disappearing

I am not happy to see LucidEra disappearing. It is not a good sign for the SaaS BI market in general and the startups in our space specifically. And I still believe Rob Ashe (IBM/Cognos) was wrong when he said that “BI doesn’t lend itself to SaaS”.

There are some fundamental differences between first generation SaaS BI providers and true cloud-based platforms like Good Data. Some of them are technological while others are simply common sense:

  • Good Data is based on true cloud architecture
  • We use Amazon Web Services to host our multitenant platform and so we have minimal fixed and very low variable costs.
  • We are true believers in Steve Blank’s Four Steps to the Epiphany, and the idea of spending over $20M before validating our go-to-market strategy is foreign to us.
  • Cookie-cutter pre-built analytics apps are should be the STARTING POINT for customers to try – not the conclusion of an enterprise sales process.
  • LucidEra was probably too expensive for small companies and too limited for large ones. And this is why we offer plain-vanilla NetSuite analytics for free.

I am sure we will see the era of success of on-demand analytics. The most useful analogy here is the disruptive business model of low cost airlines – it did not disappear after the demise of People Express airlines either…

PS. Good Data Offers Safe Harbor to LucidEra Customers (link)

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Roman Stanek is a technology visionary who has spent the past fifteen years building world-class technology companies. Currently Founder & CEO of Good Data, which provides collaborative analytics on demand, he previously co-founded first NetBeans, now a part of Sun Microsystems and one of the leading Java IDEs, and then and Systinet, now owned by Hewlett-Packard and the leading SOA Governance platform on the market.