From the Founder of Good Data, NetBeans and Systinet

Roman Stanek

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Top Stories by Roman Stanek

Business Intelligence projects are famous for low success rates, high costs and time overruns. The economics of BI are visibly broken, and have been for years. Yet BI remains the #1 technology priority according to Gartner. We could paraphrase Lee Iacocca and say: People want economical Business Intelligence solutions and they will pay ANY price to get it. Nobody argues with the need for more Business Intelligence; BI is one of the few remaining IT initiatives that can make companies more competitive. But only the largest companies can live with the costs or the high failure rates. BI is a luxury. I believe that the bad economics of BI are rooted in the IT department/BI vendor duopoly on BI infrastructure. This post focuses on IT’s inability to deliver efficient BI projects; I will write about the BI industry in my next blog: There are three fundamental reasons why... (more)

Cloud Expo Europe Keynote: Building Great Companies on the Cloud

I spoke at the first Cloud Computing Expo Europe and I enjoyed the conference very much. Here is my presentation: PS. This presentation was featured today as one of the Top Presentations of the Day by Slideshare… Tagged: Cloud Computing Expo keynote, Europe ... (more)

Small Pieces Tightly Joined: Open Source in the Cloud

It’s not a shock to state that cloud computing will disrupt the business model of commercial software. But how it will affect the open source movement? The rise of open source is clearly linked to the rise of the web. Buy a commodity piece of hardware, download source code of any of the thousands of open source projects and start to “scratch your own itch”. My Linux box will communicate with your Linux box as long as we stick to some minimal set of protocols. The web is loosely coupled and software can be developed independently in a bazaar style. It’s not quite as straightforw... (more)

COSS BI: Open Source, Open Core or Openly Naked?

BI on Ulitzer Peter Yared wrote recently a BusinessWeek guest blog post called “Failure of Commercial Open Source Software.” Not surprisingly his post caused a lot of angry replies from people who work for COSS companies. “The emperor is not naked” they argued. I believe that the COSS emperor is openly naked. And the discussion shouldn’t be whether COSS is a complete or a partial failure just because there are few successful exits that Peter neglected to mention. At the end of the day Peter’s comment that “selling software is miserable” is true. Every sales rep involved in selling ... (more)

In BI, APIs Are the Cloud’s OEM

To put it simply, I am in the business of building platforms. NetBeans was the first extensible Java IDE platform with plug-ins back in 1999. Systinet had a product that was actually called Web Application & Services Platform (WASP). But both NetBeans and Systinet were “only” what my investor Marc Andreessen calls Platform Level 2: This is the kind of platform approach that historically has been used in end-user applications to let developers build new functions that can be injected, or “plug in”, to the core system and its user interface. (Everyone should read Marc’s excellent ar... (more)